We mostly know salt as an awesome and vital flavor enhancer and a preservative from the dark days till now. But do you know you can use salt in a myriad of ways to solve common cleaning issues at home? To date, no other seasoning has satisfactorily replaced salt. It is amazing how much wonder salt can do yet it is crazily affordable. Salt solves many common challenges at home and also proves to be economical and environment-friendly, compared to products manufactured to solve the same issues. In fact, by the time you finish reading this, just like me, it will be your favorite ingredient. Here are various ways you can use salt at home:

1. Dental Hygiene

Whether you have run out of toothpaste or just trying out on something new, the salt will work just fine. It is of course, not a replacement for toothpaste, but when used with or without it, solves major issues. A saltwater mouth rinse is a great option for anyone who has gum sores, sore throat or recently had dental procedures. What salt does, it temporarily increases the pH balance in your mouth, creating an environment where bacteria struggle to survive. If you are struggling with bad breath, gargling the salt rinse will help keep your mouth odor-free. It can also brighten up your teeth when you mix it with baking soda.

2. Fruit Prevention From Browning

When apples are cut and left, they turn brown. This not only makes them look less appetizing but also their flavor and other attributes get altered. There are other methods too, like using lemon juice and honey for preserving them but using salt water is a better way. Only use a half teaspoon of salt in one cup of cold water and let the fruit soak for 10 minutes. When you want to eat the apple, you can quickly rinse under cold water to remove traces of the salt on the surface.

3. Cleaning The Sink Drains and Kitchen

Salt can be used as a nontoxic, natural sink cleaner. You probably have manufactured supplies for your cleaning, but consider how eco-friendly salt is. The combination of salt and vinegar in boiled water will cut through tough clogs, especially through grease. Although the acidity of vinegar helps to eat through the clog, salt alone can be effective. Measure a half cup of salt, then pour it directly into the drainage. Slowly pour hot water down the drain. Since you are using salt alone, you may consider repeating the process severally.

4. Stain Removal

In removing stains, you need all the help you can get. Salt is there to help. If you have a fresh grease stain, remove it by covering it with salt. Allow it to absorb the grease then brush it away. Repeat until the stain is gone. You can also remove fresh blood stain by covering it with salt, then blot with cold water. You can also remove wine stains by sprinkling stained area with enough salt to soak up liquid. Soak the fabric for about an hour then launder as usual. Additionally, in the process, it brightens the color of your faded cloth.

5. Exfoliating The Skin

Salt is not only a skin exfoliator but also a natural detoxifier since the salt absorbs the toxins from the skin. To be specific, sea salt is best used. The important difference between sea salt and table salt is that sea salt has higher levels of naturally occurring minerals. Dead skin results in an old and tired-looking skin. Exfoliating using salt is an excellent and skin-friendly way to shed the old skin. Make a paste of sea salt and water then apply it on your face. Leave for a minute before you get into the shower and massage the salt off gently as you bath. Amazingly also, sea salt’s high magnesium content makes it a powerful anti-aging weapon.

6. Burn and Itching Remedy

Although an itching skin is not a death sentence, it can be crazily irritating, depending on the severity. The causes can be allergies, insect bites, burns or a brush with poison ivy. There are definitely, a variety of products manufactured to treat the condition, but you might consider doing it naturally since you have everything to gain and nothing to lose. To relieve a bee sting, immediately wet the spot and cover with salt. In treating poison ivy, soak the exposed part in warm salty water to help hasten the end of the poison ivy irritation.

7. Extinguishing Grease Fire

There are a number of ways to put out a grease fire, and using salt is one of them. Have you ever experienced a small grease fire, whereby, little oil spills on the skillet and the pan goes in flames? The most important thing to remember, when it occurs, don’t use water at any cost. Simply look for ways to cut away oxygen. Damp a lot of salt on it. Also never, ever use just any kind of pressurized fire extinguisher on grease fires because you might make it worse. Salt is very effective in this case.

8. Keeping Cheese Fresh

I seriously doubt if anyone uses their whole block of feta cheese at once unless they have guests. You will need to store the piece that remains for future use. But this is what you should not do, wrapping it up and tossing it into the fridge. This is because when the cheese is exposed to air, it starts to dry out and the flavor becomes sharply soar. Instead, you should store it in a paste called brine. Which you can easily make at home. Simply mix two cups of water with two tablespoons of salt. Ensure the leftover is covered fully in the mixture. This not only preserves the cheese but also gives it the salty flavor punch.

9. Hand Deodorant

Salt can greatly act as a deodorant. Seriously, who would want to walk around with hands smelling of garlic or some other foul smell? You are right, no one. If you don't have other products, you can simply take a salt and vinegar then rub the mixture in your hands to remove the odors.

10. Preservation of Food

You can use salt to preserve fish or meat if you don’t have a fridge or in case the power lines are down and your fridge will not work for you.  Salt keeps the bacteria that causes beef or fish to go bad from thriving.

The above are the uses of salt, consider using them in your own home and you will be grateful you read this article

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.